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Home > Get Involved > Find a Local Affiliate > Volunteer Spotlights > Ashle Burnett and PJ Kling

  


Ashle Burnett and PJ Kling

Photo of PJ Kling and Ashle Burnett

You can't say Ashle without saying PJ, and you can't say PJ without saying Ashle. This pair, made up of two very different individuals, forms a dynamic volunteer team for the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Mid-Kansas Affiliate. Together, they are the face and voice of the Affiliate.

Ashle Burnett is a young, beautiful, married woman who is full of life. Her mother, a healthy, strong businesswoman, introduced Ashle to volunteering for Komen for the Cure at the tender age of 9 years old.

PJ Kling is a young, handsome, single man who has seen a side of breast cancer none of us like to talk about. PJ's mother was diagnosed when he was very young. He said he never remembers a time when she didn't have breast cancer. She died from the disease when he was in high school. PJ has a pink ribbon tattoo next to his heart in her memory.

Both have backgrounds in television and radio. PJ was program director for ClearChannel radio in Wichita and host of his own daytime slot on Channel 96.3 when he began volunteering with the Komen Mid-Kansas Affiliate. Heis now the executive assistant to the vice president of ClearChannel in Atlanta, Georgia, but still returns to Kansas for the Komen Wichita Race for the Cure® each September. Ashle was a news producer for a local TV station and currently hosts her own weekly segment on the local FOX affiliate.

Together these two young people use their talent and passion to speak on behalf of the Affiliate at various events. They are the voice of the Komen Wichita Race for the Cure, serving as masters of ceremony and overseeing stage production for the event.

These two wonderful volunteers reflect what is good about the younger generation. They show the community how breast cancer affects more than just the patient.