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Overweight and Weight Gain

  

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Research Fast Facts: Obesity and Breast Cancer
Fact Sheet

Body weight and BMI

Body mass index (BMI) is a measure used to define body weight status (normal, overweight and obese) in research studies. BMI includes a measure of height and weight, so it is a better comparison of body weight status than weight alone. Calculate your BMI or find your BMI in a table.  

For people ages 20 and older, weight status categories are defined as:
 

BMI 

Body weight status 

18.5 to 25.9

Normal

25.0 to 29.9

Overweight

30.0 and greater

Obese

  

Body weight, breast cancer risk and menopausal status

Many studies have linked BMI to breast cancer risk. However, BMI affects risk for pre- and postmenopausal women differently.

  • Before menopause, being overweight or obese modestly decreases breast cancer risk [11,65-67].
  • After menopause, being overweight or obese increases breast cancer risk [65-67].

 

Komen Perspectives 

Read Komen’s perspective on body weight and breast cancer risk
(September 2011).*
 

 

Body weight and premenopausal breast cancer risk

Premenopausal women who are overweight or obese have a 20 to 40 percent lower risk of breast cancer than those who are lean [11,65-67]. This benefit is not well understood and may be limited to estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers [164].  

Although being overweight or obese may lower breast cancer risk before menopause, weight gain should be avoided. Most breast cancers occur after menopause, and any weight you gain before menopause you may carry into your postmenopausal years.

Body weight and postmenopausal breast cancer risk

Postmenopausal women who are overweight or obese have a 30 to 60 percent higher breast cancer risk than those who are lean [65-67,165].  

Being overweight after menopause may increase the risk of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers more than estrogen receptor-negative cancers. A meta-analysis that combined the results of four studies found postmenopausal women who were heavy had a 70 percent greater risk of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer compared to those who were lean. However, these heavier women did not have an increased risk of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers [166].

How can body weight affect postmenopausal breast cancer risk?

In premenopausal women, most estrogens in the body are produced in the ovaries. In postmenopausal women (whose ovaries no longer produce much estrogen), estrogens mainly come from fat tissue. Fat tissue contains an enzyme called aromatase that converts hormones called androgens (made mostly in the adrenal glands) to estrogens. So, heavier women have higher blood estrogen levels than leaner women [46]. This extra estrogen likely explains at least some of the increased breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women who are overweight. Women with higher estrogen levels have an increased risk of breast cancer compared to women with lower estrogen levels [46].  

Women who are heavier also tend to have higher levels of insulin in their bodies compared to leaner women [167]. Some studies have shown an increased risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal women with high levels of insulin including women with type 2 diabetes [168-171]. Among premenopausal women, findings on a possible link between insulin levels and breast cancer risk are less clear [172-173]. These topics are still under study.  

Learn more about estrogen and breast cancer risk.

  

For a summary of research studies on body weight and breast cancer, visit the Breast Cancer Research section.

Weight gain and breast cancer risk

Gaining weight in adulthood appears to increase a woman’s risk of postmenopausal breast cancer [174]. In the largest study to date, women who gained about 20 pounds after age 18 had a 15 percent higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer compared to women who gained little or no weight [175]. Women who gained 55 pounds or more after age 18 had a 45 percent higher risk [175].  

It’s not just the weight gained from age 18 that seems to be important to risk. Even women who gain weight after menopause appear to increase their risk of breast cancer [175-176]. Findings from the same study showed that women who gained 20 pounds or more after menopause had an 18 percent higher risk of breast cancer compared to those who gained little or no weight after menopause [175].  

  

For a summary of research studies on weight gain and breast cancer, visit the Breast Cancer Research section.

Weight loss and breast cancer risk

Losing weight after menopause may help lower risk of breast cancer. One large study found women who lost four to 11 pounds after menopause had more than a 20 percent lower risk of breast cancer compared to women whose weight did not change [175]. Not all studies have shown this benefit [177].

Weight loss in adulthood and premenopausal breast cancer risk is under study [178].

Body shape and breast cancer risk

Body shape may also affect breast cancer risk. Though findings are mixed, some findings show women who put on extra weight around their middles (sometimes called "apple-shaped"), as opposed to their hips and thighs (sometimes called "pear-shaped"), have a small to moderate increased risk of breast cancer [179-183].

Body weight and breast cancer survival

Maintaining a healthy weight is important for breast cancer survivors. Learn about body weight and breast cancer recurrence and survival.  

 

Komen Perspectives 

Read Komen’s perspective on body weight and breast cancer survival
(September 2011).*
 

 

It's never too late to adopt a healthy lifestyle

Making healthy lifestyle choices has benefits at any age. Being more active, eating a balanced diet and becoming more aware of your health can be physically and mentally rewarding at any point in life.  

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s website www.choosemyplate.gov has free tools to help you set weight and activity goals for healthy living. Supertracker is a tool to help you plan, track and analyze your diet and exercise.
 

 Susan G. Komen®'s breast self-awareness messages  

 

1. Know your risk

  • Talk to both sides of your family to learn about your family health history  
  • Talk to your health care provider about your personal risk of breast cancer

2. Get screened

3. Know what is normal for you and see your health care provider if you notice any of these breast changes (see images):

  • Lump, hard knot or thickening inside the breast or underarm area
  • Swelling, warmth, redness or darkening of the breast
  • Change in the size or shape of the breast
  • Dimpling or puckering of the skin
  • Itchy, scaly sore or rash on the nipple
  • Pulling in of your nipple or other parts of the breast
  • Nipple discharge that starts suddenly
  • New pain in one spot that doesn't go away

4. Make healthy lifestyle choices

 

 

*Please note, the information provided within Komen Perspectives articles is only current as of the date of posting. Therefore, some information may be out of date at this time.   

Updated 04/11/14

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