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    Research Grants Awarded

    pi bone se granm maten The earlier the better

    Study Section:
    Breast Cancer Disparities

    Scientific Abstract:
    Background: When compared to other racial/ethnic minorities and immigrant populations in Miami, Haitian women are more likely to suffer disability and death from breast cancer, largely as a function of their stage of disease at diagnosis. Haitian women are typically diagnosed with late-stage breast cancer (Stages III and IV) when the prognosis for survival is poor. Previous research has not examined why Haitian American women present with late-stage breast cancer, despite the growing importance of this population sub-group within South Florida. Objective/Hypothesis: The purpose of the proposed research is to identify multilevel determinants that predict late-stage diagnosis of breast cancer within the South Florida Haitian community. Our aims are as follow: Specific Aims: (1) To determine demographic and socio-cultural characteristics of Haitian women diagnosed with late-stage breast cancer; (2) to characterize mammography-screening behavior of Haitian women diagnosed with late-stage breast cancer; (3) to identify community-level determinants of late-stage diagnosis of breast cancer among Haitian women; (4) to determine sustainable, culturally-appropriate methods for intervention to improve breast cancer outcomes within the South Florida Haitian community. Study Design: To accomplish study aims, we propose a two-year, cross-sectional study to evaluate multilevel determinants that may account for the exaggerated late-stage presentation of breast cancer among Haitian American women. This study will occur within the context of an existing, federally-funded community-based participatory research (CBPR) initiative, known as Partners in Action. This initiative represents a campus-community partnership between the University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center and key Haitian community-based organizations in Little Haiti, the predominately Haitian neighborhood in Miami, Florida. The proposed study will rely on semi-structured, in-depth interviews of 120 Haitian women diagnosed with late- (stages III and IV) and early-stage (0-II) breast cancer. The interviews will be conducted by Community Health Workers (CHWs), who are indigenous to Little Haiti, fluent in Haitian Creole, and trained to conduct research by the study Principal Investigator. These individuals have intimate knowledge of Little Haiti, community customs, and cultural norms. Our primary objective is to inform understanding of why Haitian women experience excess breast cancer mortality, and to use such understanding to inform future research and interventions to attenuate this disparity.

    Lay Abstract:
    Partners in Action,or Patne en Aksyon in Haitian Creole, represents a campus-community partnership between the University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center (UM SCCC) and key Haitian American community-based organizations in Miami, Florida. This partnership aims to alleviate the excess burden of breast cancer morbidity and mortality experienced by Haitian American women living in the Miami metropolitan area. When compared to other racial/ethnic minorities and immigrant populations in Miami, Haitian women are more likely to suffer disability and death from breast cancer, largely as a function of their stage of disease at diagnosis. Haitian women are typically diagnosed with late-stage breast cancer (Stages III and IV) when the prognosis for survival is poor. Previous research has not examined why Haitian American women present with late-stage breast cancer, despite the growing importance of this population sub-group within South Florida. Thus, the Community Advisory Board (CAB) for Patnè ¡n Aksyon decided to undertake research toward this end. We propose a two-year study to identify the determinants that may account for the exaggerated late-stage presentation of breast cancer among Haitian American women. We will identify such determinants using semi-structured, in-depth interviews. The in-depth interviews will provide information about socio-cultural perceptions about breast cancer and mammography screening within the Florida Haitian community. All data will be collected by Community Health Workers (CHWs) who are indigenous to Little Haiti, fluent in Haitian Creole, and trained to perform in-depth interviews. Using CHWs to collect data will help ensure the study?s success. These individuals have intimate knowledge of Little Haiti, community customs, and cultural norms. Our primary objective is to inform understanding of why Haitian die in greater numbers from breast cancer, and to use such understanding to direct future research and intervention initiatives to attenuate this disparity.