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    Home > Research & Grants > Grants Program > Research Grants > Research Grants Awarded > Abstract
    Awarded Grants
    Quality of Life in Long-Term, Multiethnic Breast Cancer Survivors

    Scientific Abstract:
    Quality of Life in Long-Term, Multiethnic Breast Cancer Survivors Background: Little is known about quality of life (QOL) in long-term Asian and Pacific Islander (API) breast cancer survivors. Hawaii's ethnic diversity provides a natural laboratory to investigate QOL in breast cancer survivors of Anglo, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, and Native Hawaiian ancestry. Filipinos and Native Hawaiians experience disproportionate breast cancer mortality; this study seeks to learn how QOL outcomes vary according to ethnicity. Objectives: The study addresses these questions: (1) How do breast cancer survivors 6-8 yrs post-diagnosis describe their QOL (symptoms, functional status, general health perceptions, & overall QOL)? (2) How do QOL outcomes in survivors vary according to ethnicity (Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Native Hawaiian, Anglo)? (3) How do QOL outcomes in survivors vary according to biological variables (e.g., therapy, comorbidities), individual characteristics (e.g., sociodemographics), psychological & cultural factors (e.g., dispositional optimism, expressiveness), & environmental characteristics (e.g., social support, economic resources)? (4) How does survivors’ QOL change from 2-3 yrs to 6-8 yrs post-diagnosis? Study Aims: This study documents QOL in API and Anglo breast cancer survivors to provide an understanding of QOL challenges, survivor needs, and ethnic differences in breast cancer survivorship. Study Design: This study assesses well-being in a cohort of breast cancer survivors who are 6-8 yrs post-diagnosis. QOL was previously assessed in these individuals 2-3 yrs post-diagnosis. Survivors were identified through a population-based tumor registry; the response rate was 60%. The cohort includes 870 women (31% Japanese, 27% Anglo, 15% Hawaiian, 11% Filipino, 9% Chinese, & 7% other). This study measures QOL using the same scale (CARES-SF) and method (mailed questionnaires) used in the first survey to assess QOL changes over time. Additional standardized self-report outcome questionnaires measure depression, sexual functioning, lymphema, positive aspects of cancer survivorship, and survivors’ needs and preferences for services and interventions. Potential Outcomes and Benefits: This study will provide information that can be applied to address needs of multiethnic breast cancer survivors. Understanding variations in QOL and preferences for interventions in diverse ethnic groups is critically important to reducing health disparities and developing culturally competent approaches to care. This study provides a step toward achieving this goal.

    Lay Abstract:
    Quality of Life in Long-Term, Multiethnic Breast Cancer Survivors Background: Little is known about quality of life (QOL) in long-term breast cancer survivors in some ethnic groups, particularly Asians and Pacific Islanders (APIs). Hawaii’s ethnic diversity provides a natural laboratory to investigate QOL in API breast cancer survivors. Filipinos and Native Hawaiians experience higher breast cancer death rates than survivors from other ethnic groups; this study explores whether QOL outcomes in survivors also vary according to ethnicity. Objectives: The study addresses these questions: (1) How do breast cancer survivors rate their QOL 6-8 years post-diagnosis? QOL includes symptoms, everyday life activities, and overall evaluations of health and QOL. (2) Do breast cancer survivors from different ethnic groups rate their QOL differently? The study population includes large numbers of Anglos, Chinese, Filipinos, Japanese, and Native Hawaiians. (3) Can we identify factors help to understand why some survivors report high QOL and others report problems? (4) Does QOL change over time, comparing outcomes 2-3 years to 6-8 years post-diagnosis? Study Aims: This study describes QOL in APIs and Anglo breast cancer survivors. The findings will help us to understand QOL challenges, ethnic differences in breast cancer survivorship, and the needs of these individuals. Study Design: This study measures well-being in a cohort of breast cancer survivors who are 6-8 years post-diagnosis. Their QOL was previously assessed 2-3 years post-diagnosis. Survivors were identified through a population-based tumor registry; 60% of the people originally contacted returned completed questionnaires. The cohort includes 870 women (31% Japanese, 27% Anglo, 15% Hawaiian, 11% Filipino, 9% Chinese, and 7% other). The proposed project measures QOL using the same measure (the CARES-SF) and method (mailed questionnaires) used in the first survey to assess QOL changes over time. Additional standard questionnaires will measure depression, sexual functioning, lymphema, positive aspects of cancer survivorship, and survivors’ needs and preferences for services and interventions. Potential Outcomes and Benefits: This study will provide information that will help to address needs of multiethnic breast cancer survivors. Understanding variations in QOL and preferences for interventions in diverse ethnic groups is critically important to reducing health disparities and developing culturally competent approaches to care. This study provides a step toward achieving this goal.