Susan G Komen  
I've Been Diagnosed With Breast Cancer Someone I Know Was Diagnosed Share Your Story Join Us And Stay Informed Donate To End Breast Cancer
    Home > Research & Grants > Grants Program > Research Grants > Research Grants Awarded > Abstract
    Awarded Grants
    Reducing Disparities in Breast Cancer Screening in Chinese American Women

    Scientific Abstract:
    Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in Chinese-American women. Chinese Americans are rapidly growing and are the largest Asian population in the U.S. However, Chinese Americans have much lower mammography screening rates and experience poorer survival following diagnosis than other Asian and Whites. Unique cultural perspectives may influence Chinese-American women’s screening behavior. To date, few culturally sensitive interventions have been developed and evaluated in this growing US population subgroup. Objective and aim: Our experienced multidisciplinary research team will compare the effectiveness of two interventions developed with prior Komen funding based on the Health Belief Model to target Chinese-American women to increase their mammography screening use. Hypothesis: A multifaceted culturally tailored and linguistically appropriate intervention (culturally tailored drama video plus culturally tailored brochure) will be more effective than the single modality and low-intensity culturally tailored brochure to increase mammography screening rates. Study Design: We will recruit a community-based sample of 400 Chinese women aged 40 and older who have not had a mammogram in the previous 12 months. After obtaining baseline data, participants will be randomized to either receive the video plus the brochure or the brochure alone. Participants will be contacted via telephone 6-8 months following the baseline interview to assess self-reported mammography use, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs. Outcomes: The primary outcome of this randomized trial will be self-reported mammography rates. Secondary outcomes include knowledge about mammography guidelines, health beliefs, and attitudes about breast cancer risk and the benefits of mammography. Potential Benefits: If the multifaceted, culturally tailored linguistically appropriate intervention is effective at increasing mammography adherence, this approach could be rapidly disseminated and tested in the many other US communities with large Chinese-American populations. This type of intervention would be feasible to deliver in a wide variety of settings, will be fairly low-cost to deliver, and holds the promise of decreasing disparities in outcomes for this understudied and growing minority population.

    Lay Abstract:
    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in Chinese-American women. Chinese Americans are rapidly growing and are the largest Asian population in the U.S. However, Chinese Americans have much lower mammography screening rates than other minority groups and experience poorer survival than other Asians and Whites. Unique cultural perspectives may influence Chinese-American women’s mammography screening behavior. To date, there has been little research focused on improving mammography adherence in this growing US population subgroup. In particular, there has been little research that has attempted to develop interventions that incorporate Chinese cultural perspectives. This study is designed to compare the effectiveness of two interventions (culturally tailored drama video and culturally tailored brochure) targeted to Chinese-American women to increase mammography screening adherence. We hypothesize that our multifaceted, culturally tailored drama video plus culturally tailored brochure will be more effective than the lower-intensity culturally tailored brochure in increasing mammography adherence. We will recruit a community-based sample of 400 Chinese women aged 40 and older from the Washington DC area who have not had a mammogram in the last 12 months. Following a baseline telephone interview, participants will be randomized to receive either the video plus the brochure or the brochure alone. Participants will be contacted for a follow-up telephone interview 6-8 months following randomization to assess self-reported mammography use, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about breast cancer and use of mammography. The primary outcome will be self-reported mammography rates. Secondary outcomes will include knowledge about mammography guidelines, breast cancer related health beliefs, and attitudes about the benefits of mammography. If the multifaceted, culturally tailored, and linguistically appropriate intervention is effective in increasing mammography rates, this approach could be rapidly exported and tested in the many other US communities with large Chinese-American populations. This type of intervention would be feasible in many settings, will be fairly low-cost to deliver, and holds the promise of decreasing disparities in outcomes for this understudied and growing minority population.