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    Awarded Grants
    A Study of Effectivenss of Esperanza y Vida: A Breast Cancer Intervention for Immigrant Latinas

    Scientific Abstract:
    Background: Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among Latinas in the United States. Latina screening rates are still significantly lower than those of White, non-Hispanic women. Based on qualitative research with immigrant Latinos in Arkansas and New York, Esperanza y Vida was developed as a spiritually based, culturally competent breast and cervical cancer education outreach intervention designed to increase knowledge and screening in diverse Latina populations. Hypothesis: The goal of the proposed intervention research is to study the effectiveness of this education program for reaching members of the Latino population in order to increase breast cancer knowledge and screening behaviors in this population. It is hypothesized that participation in Esperanza y Vida will significantly increase knowledge, intent to screen, and screening as compared to participants in control groups receiving health information on another topic (diabetes). Specific Aims: 1. Evaluate the effectiveness of the Esperanza y Vida intervention to increase breast cancer knowledge and intent to screen in Latina participants compared to Latinas in a control health education program on diabetes. 2. Evaluate the effectiveness of the Esperanza y Vida intervention at 2 month follow up to increase intent and breast cancer screening among Latina participants compared to Latinas in the control health education program. Study Design: This quasi-experimental design will measure increases in knowledge and screening outcomes with participants in control and intervention communities of recent Latino immigrants in rural Arkansas and urban New York City over two years. The intervention is designed to educate Latina women and their partners to address barriers and lack of knowledge as confirmed by our developmental pilot research. The control will be a comparable program focusing on diabetes information. Measures in knowledge will be administered pre- and post- intervention presentations for control and intervention sites. Screening and intent to screen will be assessed at 2 months by telephone through a screening assessment and an instrument based on the stages of change model. Potential Outcomes and Benefits: It is anticipated that this research will demonstrate outcome effectiveness and findings to support a larger rural/urban comparison among diverse Latina groups. It is also anticipated that this outreach model may be replicated in other sites, especially with the growing populations of immigrants in the Mid South and urban areas such as Buffalo, New York and Bridgeport, CT.

    Lay Abstract:
    A Study of the Effectiveness of Esperanza y Vida Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among Latinas in the United States. Latina screening rates are still significantly lower than those of White, non-Hispanic women. Based on pilot research with immigrant Latinos in Arkansas and New York, Esperanza y Vida (Hope & Life) was developed as a spiritually based, culturally competent breast and cervical cancer education outreach intervention designed to increase knowledge and screening in diverse Latina populations. The goal of the proposed intervention research is to study the effectiveness of this education program for reaching members of the Latino population in order to increase breast cancer knowledge and screening behaviors in this population. It is expected that participation in Esperanza y Vida will significantly increase knowledge, intent to screen, and screening as compared to participants in control groups receiving health information on another topic (diabetes). 1. Evaluate the effectiveness of the Esperanza y Vida intervention to increase breast cancer knowledge and intent to screen in Latina participants compared to Latinas in a control health education program on diabetes. 2. Evaluate the effectiveness of the Esperanza y Vida intervention at 2 month follow up to increase intent and breast cancer screening among female Latina participants compared to Latinas in the control health education program. This study will measure increases in knowledge and screening outcomes with participants in control and intervention communities of recent Latino immigrants in rural Arkansas and urban New York City over two years. The intervention is a program designed to educate Latina women and their partners to address barriers and lack of knowledge as confirmed by our developmental pilot research. The control will be a comparable program focusing on diabetes information. Measures in knowledge will be administered before and after the educational programs. Screening and intent to screen will be assessed at 2 months by telephone through a screening assessment and a questionnaire. It is anticipated that this research will demonstrate if the intervention is effective in changing behaviors and knowledge in the Latinas reached. From this we anticipate being able to do a larger rural/urban comparison among diverse Latina groups. It is also anticipated that this outreach intervention model may be replicated in other sites, especially with the growing populations of immigrants in the Mid South and urban areas such as Buffalo, New York and Bridgeport, CT.