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    Awarded Grants
    Asian Indian Breast Cancer Project

    Scientific Abstract:
    Asian Indian Breast Cancer Project Background: Asian Indians are one of the fastest-growing immigrant groups and the largest Asian subpopulation in the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Areas. However, little is known about the health status and health practices within this group. Despite the myth of a model minority of Asian Indians, they still have a diverse cultural and socioeconomic background. Cancer is the second leading cause of death among Asian Indian women in the U.S. Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of morbidity and premature deaths among women in India, but studies on breast cancer and breast cancer screening behavior among Asian Indians living in the United States are lacking. Objective/Hypothesis: The primary objective of the study is to explore and describe the nature of breast cancer screening behavior and to identify perceived barriers, efficacy beliefs, risk perceptions, and health care resources for Asian Indian women. Specific Aims: 1. Estimate the prevalence of breast cancer screening tests among Asian Indian women; 2. Examine the relations of socio-demographic characteristics and acculturation to breast cancer screening; 3. Identify the role and significance of perceived barriers and health care resources related to breast cancer screening; 4. Understand Asian Indian women’s perceptions about their ability to take preventive action; and 5. Determine how Asian Indian women perceive their risk to breast cancer. Study Design: The study employs a cross-sectional design. A total of 450 Asian Indian women 40 years of age and older from four Asian Indian temples in the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Areas (i.e., Maryland, Washington DC, and Northern Virginia) will be recruited. A culturally appropriate questionnaire will be developed using an existing questionnaire and through focus groups. Face-to-face interviews will be conducted in English or Indian languages by female bilingual Asian Indian interviewers. Potential Outcomes and Benefits of the Research: The findings of the study will provide essential information for formulating a theoretical framework of preventive health behaviors for Asian Indian women. The information obtained through this study will be valuable in developing intervention strategies and programs for economically disadvantaged groups of Asian Indian women, and will also broaden our understanding of cancer control needs in immigrant populations in general.

    Lay Abstract:
    Asian Indian Breast Cancer Project Asian Americans are the fastest growing minority population in the United States, with 30 distinct ethnic groups, of which Asian Indians are the third largest. Breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers among Asian Indian women living in India. However, there are few studies reported on the rate of breast cancer and breast cancer screening behavior among Asian Indian women living in the United States. In this study, we would like to understand some of the problems why Asian Indian women are not aware of the importance of breast cancer screening. We also would like to look at some issues like: 1) how many Asian Indian women get checked for breast cancer; 2) how breast cancer screening behaviors are related to the number of years lived in the U.S. and the grade of schooling; 3) how they perceive the risk of getting breast cancer; 4) what difficulties were encountered to have breast cancer screening; and 5) what breast cancer screening procedures are feasible for them to follow and practice. A total of 450 Asian Indian women, 40 years of age and older, who live in the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Areas, will be selected. A survey questionnaire, which can be easily understood by the Asian Indian women, will be made. The questions will be asked in English or Indian languages by female Asian Indian interviewers. The findings of the study will help our understanding of cancer control needs in Asian Indian women. This study will be a foundation to develop educational programs to increase cancer awareness as well as to promote breast cancer screening for poor and low-educated Asian Indian women.